Jaime Eduardo Fernandez jaimefernandez93@yahoo 3d modeler
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raktraktor
The Raktraktor. A massive war vehicle that shoots missile rounds that can travel immense distances. On both sides the Raktraktor is fully loaded with two mini guns that rotate in a 150 degree angle ready to devour anything in its path. The vehicle is an overwhelming 40 feet long and 20 feet high. A heavily armored vehicle that can withstand bombings, 50 caliber rounds, and even radically invasive projectiles. Space inside the cockpit seats only two, a driver and a pilot to control the missiles when they fire. The pilot also controls the mini guns when the driver is managing the vehicle. An original concept created by Mark Stevens, an artist that crafts miniature models out of a verity of scarps and toys. I transformed one of the concepts, the Raktraktor, into a real life size scale.
The greatest challenge of modeling a massive vehicle, is actually making it look and feel massive. Especially if you're transforming a toy sculpture into a 3d model that is required to look massive. As a modeler, we are good imitators and mock styles with in our modeling. Most of the time, we are going to build something that requires to look real. The biggest problem is making it look its actual size, as well as making it look realistic. It's all in the camera angles and camera lens. Being in the correct lens will help give a model a massive look, but really you have to think in terms of how would it look if someone actually took a picture of this vehicle in person. Looking up at the vehicle gives it dominance and larger scale.
wire frame
clay renders
the process
The Raktraktor, is a massive war vehicle. I began on this project by boxing out the biggest shapes and going forth from there. This was the first phase on bringing the Raktraktor to life.
Once the blocking was complete, I began blocking in the smaller objects. It took many iterations to get the Raktraktor to look massive. Working from a toy can be tricky. Although every object was blocked in, the model still looked like a small toy. Taking away some assets started giving this piece larger scale, but the end result still felt toy like. You can see some iterations above of where the Raktraktor started. Many changes took place to finally get a realistic look.
The first changes were the tire treads. Making the tire treads smaller and a bit thinner was the second iteration for the tires. Another change was putting a different mini gun on the sides of the Raktraktor to make the vehicle look more mean.
A double mini gun was added to the Raktraktor. A smaller version of the mini gun is installed underneath the larger mini gun. This will defiantly devour anything in its path. This is a second iteration of the mini guns.
After all of the front was finally blocked in, I began blocking in the engine. This fictional vehicle has a very odd engine that doesn't even exist, which makes it difficult to build and gather reference for. The only reference I had was from the original artist's toy model. I blocked in what I could make out, and went forth from there.
After the engine was blocked out, it got easier putting the rest of the parts together. On the image shown above, you can see a basic breakdown of some of the parts made for the entire back engine. It's difficult creating something that doesn't exist and making it look functional. That was another challenge to over come while creating the engine for this thing.
This is an iteration where the back engine was blocked out. Before the tire treads were changed. As for the cables, I used splines to give me an organic natural path for the cables to follow. This is the same iteration where the back engine was blocked out, but with a few adjustments and more detail added. The legs needed to be enlarged because the size of the entire back didn't make sense that it would be held by little bitty legs.
The most tedious tasks were creating the splines to get an organic natural flow of the cables, wires, chains, and ropes. I carefully moved vertices in place while the spline was in a blocked path. Once the splines were in their proper place, I proceeded on creating the rope, chains, etc, and then used a path deformed modifier on the objects along the splines. Alone the geometry flowed along perfectly through the splines.
This is the third tire iteration. For the last time, I changed the tire treads based off of industrial tires. Also, these tires are holding up a heavy vehicle, so there needs to be some kind of weight showing on these tires. Using a FFD box in the modifiers helped me apply weight to the tire.
I took the model into Mari for texturing purposes. Mari is really great for visually texturing your 3d model. I staked up my layers beginning with flat colors, and then putting metal, dirt, etc. Of course, the model needs to be unwrapped before being able to texture it in Mari.
This was not a lowpoly unwrap. I unwrapped the highpoly and exported this out into Mari. In Mari I painted out 4k maps. There were a total of 14 maps painted out for the Raktraktor with the same process as the map shown above.
The first lighting set up used to light the Raktraktor was a day lighting system. This lighting method was used to capture the lighting for the Raktraktor as if it were outside. Although the lighting set up was made to look like the Raktraktor was outside, I re-lit the scene by using five photometric lights. Although the lighting was corrected, the colors are too saturated. I desaturated the colors in Photoshop and applied a depth of field. The end results are back on top.
mood board
Raktraktor reference Tyres reference
This mood board was put together to help texture the Raktraktor
back to top
Jaime Eduardo Fernandez jaimefernandez93@yahoo 3d modeler
home
resume
raktraktor The Raktraktor. A massive war vehicle that shoots missile rounds that can travel immense distances. On both sides the Raktraktor is fully loaded with two mini guns that rotate in a 150 degree angle ready to devour anything in its path. The vehicle is an overwhelming 40 feet long and 20 feet high. A heavily armored vehicle that can withstand bombings, 50 caliber rounds, and even radically invasive projectiles. Space inside the cockpit seats only two, a driver and a pilot to control the missiles when they fire. The pilot also controls the mini guns when the driver is managing the vehicle. An original concept created by Mark Stevens, an artist that crafts miniature models out of a verity of scarps and toys. I transformed one of the concepts, the Raktraktor, into a real life size scale. The greatest challenge of modeling a massive vehicle, is actually making it look and feel massive. Especially if you're transforming a toy sculpture into a 3d model that is required to look massive. As a modeler, we are good imitators and mock styles with in our modeling. Most of the time, we are going to build something that requires to look real. The biggest problem is making it look its actual size, as well as making it look realistic. It's all in the camera angles and camera lens. Being in the correct lens will help give a model a massive look, but really you have to think in terms of how would it look if someone actually took a picture of this vehicle in person. Looking up at the vehicle gives it dominance and larger scale. wire frame clay renders the process
The Raktraktor, is a massive war vehicle. I began on this project by boxing out the biggest shapes and going forth from there. This was the first phase on bringing the Raktraktor to life.
Once the blocking was complete, I began blocking in the smaller objects. It took many iterations to get the Raktraktor to look massive. Working from a toy can be tricky. Although every object was blocked in, the model still looked like a small toy. Taking away some assets started giving this piece larger scale, but the end result still felt toy like. You can see some iterations above of where the Raktraktor started. Many changes took place to finally get a realistic look.
The first changes were the tire treads. Making the tire treads smaller and a bit thinner was the second iteration for the tires. Another change was putting a different mini gun on the sides of the Raktraktor to make the vehicle look more mean.
A double mini gun was added to the Raktraktor. A smaller version of the mini gun is installed underneath the larger mini gun. This will defiantly devour anything in its path. This is a second iteration of the mini guns.
After all of the front was finally blocked in, I began blocking in the engine. This fictional vehicle has a very odd engine that doesn't even exist, which makes it difficult to build and gather reference for. The only reference I had was from the original artist's toy model. I blocked in what I could make out, and went forth from there.
After the engine was blocked out, it got easier putting the rest of the parts together. On the image shown above, you can see a basic breakdown of some of the parts made for the entire back engine. It's difficult creating something that doesn't exist and making it look functional. That was another challenge to over come while creating the engine for this thing.
This is an iteration where the back engine was blocked out. Before the tire treads were changed. As for the cables, I used splines to give me an organic natural path for the cables to follow. This is the same iteration where the back engine was blocked out, but with a few adjustments and more detail added. The legs needed to be enlarged because the size of the entire back didn't make sense that it would be held by little bitty legs.
The most tedious tasks were creating the splines to get an organic natural flow of the cables, wires, chains, and ropes. I carefully moved vertices in place while the spline was in a blocked path. Once the splines were in their proper place, I proceeded on creating the rope, chains, etc, and then used a path deformed modifier on the objects along the splines. Alone the geometry flowed along perfectly through the splines.
This is the third tire iteration. For the last time, I changed the tire treads based off of industrial tires. Also, these tires are holding up a heavy vehicle, so there needs to be some kind of weight showing on these tires. Using a FFD box in the modifiers helped me apply weight to the tire.
I took the model into Mari for texturing purposes. Mari is really great for visually texturing your 3d model. I staked up my layers beginning with flat colors, and then putting metal, dirt, etc. Of course, the model needs to be unwrapped before being able to texture it in Mari.
This was not a lowpoly unwrap. I unwrapped the highpoly and exported this out into Mari. In Mari I painted out 4k maps. There were a total of 14 maps painted out for the Raktraktor with the same process as the map shown above.
The first lighting set up used to light the Raktraktor was a day lighting system. This lighting method was used to capture the lighting for the Raktraktor as if it were outside. Although the lighting set up was made to look like the Raktraktor was outside, I re-lit the scene by using five photometric lights. Although the lighting was corrected, the colors are too saturated. I desaturated the colors in Photoshop and applied a depth of field. The end results are back on top.
mood board
Raktraktor reference Tyres reference
This mood board was put together to help texture the Raktraktor
back to top
jaimefernandez93@yahoo 3d Modeler Jaime Eduardo Fernandez
home
resume
raktraktor The Raktraktor. A massive war vehicle that shoots missile rounds that can travel immense distances. On both sides the Raktraktor is fully loaded with two mini guns that rotate in a 150 degree angle ready to devour anything in its path. The vehicle is an overwhelming 40 feet long and 20 feet high. A heavily armored vehicle that can withstand bombings, 50 caliber rounds, and even radically invasive projectiles. Space inside the cockpit seats only two, a driver and a pilot to control the missiles when they fire. The pilot also controls the mini guns when the driver is managing the vehicle. An original concept created by Mark Stevens, an artist that crafts miniature models out of a verity of scarps and toys. I transformed one of the concepts, the Raktraktor, into a real life size scale. The greatest challenge of modeling a massive vehicle, is actually making it look and feel massive. Especially if you're transforming a toy sculpture into a 3d model that is required to look massive. As a modeler, we are good imitators and mock styles with in our modeling. Most of the time, we are going to build something that requires to look real. The biggest problem is making it look its actual size, as well as making it look realistic. It's all in the camera angles and camera lens. Being in the correct lens will help give a model a massive look, but really you have to think in terms of how would it look if someone actually took a picture of this vehicle in person. Looking up at the vehicle gives it dominance and larger scale. wire frame clay renders the process
The Raktraktor, is a massive war vehicle. I began on this project by boxing out the biggest shapes and going forth from there. This was the first phase on bringing the Raktraktor to life.
Once the blocking was complete, I began blocking in the smaller objects. It took many iterations to get the Raktraktor to look massive. Working from a toy can be tricky. Although every object was blocked in, the model still looked like a small toy. Taking away some assets started giving this piece larger scale, but the end result still felt toy like. You can see some iterations above of where the Raktraktor started. Many changes took place to finally get a realistic look.
The first changes were the tire treads. Making the tire treads smaller and a bit thinner was the second iteration for the tires. Another change was putting a different mini gun on the sides of the Raktraktor to make the vehicle look more mean.
A double mini gun was added to the Raktraktor. A smaller version of the mini gun is installed underneath the larger mini gun. This will defiantly devour anything in its path. This is a second iteration of the mini guns.
After all of the front was finally blocked in, I began blocking in the engine. This fictional vehicle has a very odd engine that doesn't even exist, which makes it difficult to build and gather reference for. The only reference I had was from the original artist's toy model. I blocked in what I could make out, and went forth from there.
After the engine was blocked out, it got easier putting the rest of the parts together. On the image shown above, you can see a basic breakdown of some of the parts made for the entire back engine. It's difficult creating something that doesn't exist and making it look functional. That was another challenge to over come while creating the engine for this thing.
This is an iteration where the back engine was blocked out. Before the tire treads were changed. As for the cables, I used splines to give me an organic natural path for the cables to follow. This is the same iteration where the back engine was blocked out, but with a few adjustments and more detail added. The legs needed to be enlarged because the size of the entire back didn't make sense that it would be held by little bitty legs.
The most tedious tasks were creating the splines to get an organic natural flow of the cables, wires, chains, and ropes. I carefully moved vertices in place while the spline was in a blocked path. Once the splines were in their proper place, I proceeded on creating the rope, chains, etc, and then used a path deformed modifier on the objects along the splines. Alone the geometry flowed along perfectly through the splines.
This is the third tire iteration. For the last time, I changed the tire treads based off of industrial tires. Also, these tires are holding up a heavy vehicle, so there needs to be some kind of weight showing on these tires. Using a FFD box in the modifiers helped me apply weight to the tire.
I took the model into Mari for texturing purposes. Mari is really great for visually texturing your 3d model. I staked up my layers beginning with flat colors, and then putting metal, dirt, etc. Of course, the model needs to be unwrapped before being able to texture it in Mari.
This was not a lowpoly unwrap. I unwrapped the highpoly and exported this out into Mari. In Mari I painted out 4k maps. There were a total of 14 maps painted out for the Raktraktor with the same process as the map shown above.
The first lighting set up used to light the Raktraktor was a day lighting system. This lighting method was used to capture the lighting for the Raktraktor as if it were outside. Although the lighting set up was made to look like the Raktraktor was outside, I re-lit the scene by using five photometric lights. Although the lighting was corrected, the colors are too saturated. I desaturated the colors in Photoshop and applied a depth of field. The end results are back on top.
mood board
Raktraktor reference Tyres reference
This mood board was put together to help texture the Raktraktor
back to top
Jaime Eduardo Fernandez jaimefernandez93@yahoo 3d modeler
home
resume
raktraktor The Raktraktor. A massive war vehicle that shoots missile rounds that can travel immense distances. On both sides the Raktraktor is fully loaded with two mini guns that rotate in a 150 degree angle ready to devour anything in its path. The vehicle is an overwhelming 40 feet long and 20 feet high. A heavily armored vehicle that can withstand bombings, 50 caliber rounds, and even radically invasive projectiles. Space inside the cockpit seats only two, a driver and a pilot to control the missiles when they fire. The pilot also controls the mini guns when the driver is managing the vehicle. An original concept created by Mark Stevens, an artist that crafts miniature models out of a verity of scarps and toys. I transformed one of the concepts, the Raktraktor, into a real life size scale. The greatest challenge of modeling a massive vehicle, is actually making it look and feel massive. Especially if you're transforming a toy sculpture into a 3d model that is required to look massive. As a modeler, we are good imitators and mock styles with in our modeling. Most of the time, we are going to build something that requires to look real. The biggest problem is making it look its actual size, as well as making it look realistic. It's all in the camera angles and camera lens. Being in the correct lens will help give a model a massive look, but really you have to think in terms of how would it look if someone actually took a picture of this vehicle in person. Looking up at the vehicle gives it dominance and larger scale. wire frame clay renders the process
The Raktraktor, is a massive war vehicle. I began on this project by boxing out the biggest shapes and going forth from there. This was the first phase on bringing the Raktraktor to life.
Once the blocking was complete, I began blocking in the smaller objects. It took many iterations to get the Raktraktor to look massive. Working from a toy can be tricky. Although every object was blocked in, the model still looked like a small toy. Taking away some assets started giving this piece larger scale, but the end result still felt toy like. You can see some iterations above of where the Raktraktor started. Many changes took place to finally get a realistic look.
The first changes were the tire treads. Making the tire treads smaller and a bit thinner was the second iteration for the tires. Another change was putting a different mini gun on the sides of the Raktraktor to make the vehicle look more mean.
A double mini gun was added to the Raktraktor. A smaller version of the mini gun is installed underneath the larger mini gun. This will defiantly devour anything in its path. This is a second iteration of the mini guns.
After all of the front was finally blocked in, I began blocking in the engine. This fictional vehicle has a very odd engine that doesn't even exist, which makes it difficult to build and gather reference for. The only reference I had was from the original artist's toy model. I blocked in what I could make out, and went forth from there.
After the engine was blocked out, it got easier putting the rest of the parts together. On the image shown above, you can see a basic breakdown of some of the parts made for the entire back engine. It's difficult creating something that doesn't exist and making it look functional. That was another challenge to over come while creating the engine for this thing.
This is an iteration where the back engine was blocked out. Before the tire treads were changed. As for the cables, I used splines to give me an organic natural path for the cables to follow. This is the same iteration where the back engine was blocked out, but with a few adjustments and more detail added. The legs needed to be enlarged because the size of the entire back didn't make sense that it would be held by little bitty legs.
The most tedious tasks were creating the splines to get an organic natural flow of the cables, wires, chains, and ropes. I carefully moved vertices in place while the spline was in a blocked path. Once the splines were in their proper place, I proceeded on creating the rope, chains, etc, and then used a path deformed modifier on the objects along the splines. Alone the geometry flowed along perfectly through the splines.
This is the third tire iteration. For the last time, I changed the tire treads based off of industrial tires. Also, these tires are holding up a heavy vehicle, so there needs to be some kind of weight showing on these tires. Using a FFD box in the modifiers helped me apply weight to the tire.
I took the model into Mari for texturing purposes. Mari is really great for visually texturing your 3d model. I staked up my layers beginning with flat colors, and then putting metal, dirt, etc. Of course, the model needs to be unwrapped before being able to texture it in Mari.
This was not a lowpoly unwrap. I unwrapped the highpoly and exported this out into Mari. In Mari I painted out 4k maps. There were a total of 14 maps painted out for the Raktraktor with the same process as the map shown above.
The first lighting set up used to light the Raktraktor was a day lighting system. This lighting method was used to capture the lighting for the Raktraktor as if it were outside. Although the lighting set up was made to look like the Raktraktor was outside, I re-lit the scene by using five photometric lights. Although the lighting was corrected, the colors are too saturated. I desaturated the colors in Photoshop and applied a depth of field. The end results are back on top.
mood board
Raktraktor reference Tyres reference
This mood board was put together to help texture the Raktraktor
back to top
Jaime Eduardo Fernandez jaimefernandez93@yahoo 3d Modeler

 

 

home
resume
raktraktor The Raktraktor. A massive war vehicle that shoots missile rounds that can travel immense distances. On both sides the Raktraktor is fully loaded with two mini guns that rotate in a 150 degree angle ready to devour anything in its path. The vehicle is an overwhelming 40 feet long and 20 feet high. A heavily armored vehicle that can withstand bombings, 50 caliber rounds, and even radically invasive projectiles. Space inside the cockpit seats only two, a driver and a pilot to control the missiles when they fire. The pilot also controls the mini guns when the driver is managing the vehicle. An original concept created by Mark Stevens, an artist that crafts miniature models out of a verity of scarps and toys. I transformed one of the concepts, the Raktraktor, into a real life size scale. The greatest challenge of modeling a massive vehicle, is actually making it look and feel massive. Especially if you're transforming a toy sculpture into a 3d model that is required to look massive. As a modeler, we are good imitators and mock styles with in our modeling. Most of the time, we are going to build something that requires to look real. The biggest problem is making it look its actual size, as well as making it look realistic. It's all in the camera angles and camera lens. Being in the correct lens will help give a model a massive look, but really you have to think in terms of how would it look if someone actually took a picture of this vehicle in person. Looking up at the vehicle gives it dominance and larger scale. wire frame clay renders the process
The Raktraktor, is a massive war vehicle. I began on this project by boxing out the biggest shapes and going forth from there. This was the first phase on bringing the Raktraktor to life.
Once the blocking was complete, I began blocking in the smaller objects. It took many iterations to get the Raktraktor to look massive. Working from a toy can be tricky. Although every object was blocked in, the model still looked like a small toy. Taking away some assets started giving this piece larger scale, but the end result still felt toy like. You can see some iterations above of where the Raktraktor started. Many changes took place to finally get a realistic look.
The first changes were the tire treads. Making the tire treads smaller and a bit thinner was the second iteration for the tires. Another change was putting a different mini gun on the sides of the Raktraktor to make the vehicle look more mean.
A double mini gun was added to the Raktraktor. A smaller version of the mini gun is installed underneath the larger mini gun. This will defiantly devour anything in its path. This is a second iteration of the mini guns.
After all of the front was finally blocked in, I began blocking in the engine. This fictional vehicle has a very odd engine that doesn't even exist, which makes it difficult to build and gather reference for. The only reference I had was from the original artist's toy model. I blocked in what I could make out, and went forth from there.
After the engine was blocked out, it got easier putting the rest of the parts together. On the image shown above, you can see a basic breakdown of some of the parts made for the entire back engine. It's difficult creating something that doesn't exist and making it look functional. That was another challenge to over come while creating the engine for this thing.
This is an iteration where the back engine was blocked out. Before the tire treads were changed. As for the cables, I used splines to give me an organic natural path for the cables to follow. This is the same iteration where the back engine was blocked out, but with a few adjustments and more detail added. The legs needed to be enlarged because the size of the entire back didn't make sense that it would be held by little bitty legs.
The most tedious tasks were creating the splines to get an organic natural flow of the cables, wires, chains, and ropes. I carefully moved vertices in place while the spline was in a blocked path. Once the splines were in their proper place, I proceeded on creating the rope, chains, etc, and then used a path deformed modifier on the objects along the splines. Alone the geometry flowed along perfectly through the splines.
This is the third tire iteration. For the last time, I changed the tire treads based off of industrial tires. Also, these tires are holding up a heavy vehicle, so there needs to be some kind of weight showing on these tires. Using a FFD box in the modifiers helped me apply weight to the tire.
I took the model into Mari for texturing purposes. Mari is really great for visually texturing your 3d model. I staked up my layers beginning with flat colors, and then putting metal, dirt, etc. Of course, the model needs to be unwrapped before being able to texture it in Mari.
This was not a lowpoly unwrap. I unwrapped the highpoly and exported this out into Mari. In Mari I painted out 4k maps. There were a total of 14 maps painted out for the Raktraktor with the same process as the map shown above.
The first lighting set up used to light the Raktraktor was a day lighting system. This lighting method was used to capture the lighting for the Raktraktor as if it were outside. Although the lighting set up was made to look like the Raktraktor was outside, I re-lit the scene by using five photometric lights. Although the lighting was corrected, the colors are too saturated. I desaturated the colors in Photoshop and applied a depth of field. The end results are back on top.
mood board
Raktraktor reference Tyres reference
This mood board was put together to help texture the Raktraktor
back to top