Jaime Eduardo Fernandez jaimefernandez93@yahoo 3d modeler
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Mortier 120mm Rayé Tracté Modèle F1
The Mortier 120mm Rayé Tracté Modèle F1 is a heavy mortar originated by the French. Rayé Tracté is French for rifled,towed. The Mortier is usually towed by a heavy armored vehicle called VTM 120 (Véhicule Tracteur Mortier de 120 mm). Rounds can be fired out of the Mortier by simply dropping them down the barrel. Once the rounds collide with the bottom of the barrel's tube base, automatic firing occurs. This military weapon can fire rounds as high as 8,000 ft with a kill radius of 250 ft when it hits the ground.
Painting realistic textures on 3d models is a difficult task to accomplish. A main problem was making this piece look like a believable war vehicle with textures that accented the 3d model. Texturing the Mortier model was the greatest task to overcome. Slapping textures and rust on a model doesn't automatically make it look realistic. Creating believable textures is produced by doing your fair share of research, photo referencing, metal study, and how weathering affects metal and a verity of surfaces. Also, keeping in mind that this is a weapon, and that lingered gun powder also eats up the metal.
wire frame
The wire frames were rendered out in a blocked stage to demonstrate the actual shapes used to create the Mortier.
clay renders
the process
Starting with the big shapes first. Matching the same angle of the shot from the reference is a great way to make sure the first stage of creating this model is correct. Relying on one shot can be critical to the models proportions not looking accurately correct. This uses the most out of the reference images.
Early blocking stages of the model before it was finalized and converted into a highpoly. When matching the angles of the reference images, it doesn't have to be perfect. Something close to the shot will do the job and help the modeler visualize what needs to be modified or changed.
Once the model was completed and the proportions were as close as they could be to the reference image, additional attachments were made. Such as the scope. A detailed breakdown on how the shapes were made and how the scope of the Mortier was assembled in 3ds max is shown above.
Detailed exploded view of the the scope attachment. All the shapes are visible in this demonstration.
Texturing the Mortier model was the greatest challenge to accomplish. Shooting for realism in the textures can be difficult task to complete. I unwrapped all my objects in 3ds max, then exported the objects with their flattened maps backed down. I used the Foundry's Mari 3d painting program to get my textures. The objects were imported into Mari. Observing the object in front of you can be better in making textures for it. When painting the Mortier, Mari allowed me to layer my textures. Beginning with the base color of the object then leading on to dirt, rust, scratches, etc, helps bring the textures to life as well as better your work flow. It's the same as blocking the model, then proceeding to modeling.
At first, the Mortier was painted green, but then the textures were a little too much. To back away from the overwhelming rusted look, importing the textures into 3ds max and using a color correction in the material editor helped cover up almost of the textures. It ended up being a serendipity. The textures look as if paint were trying to cover up the grime and rust that the Mortier has dealt with in the past. This helped give the texture a great surface break up.
Four renders were rendered out of 3ds max, those of which included the raw beauty render, two ambient occlusion renders, and a z-depth render. Other manipulations took place within Photoshop. Blending layers and changing level corrections helped give this model proper lighting.
Mood board
A mood board was created to help provide visual reference on how this model will look. Reference
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Jaime Eduardo Fernandez jaimefernandez93@yahoo 3d modeler
home
resume
Mortier 120mm Rayé Tracté Modèle F1 The Mortier 120mm Rayé Tracté Modèle F1 is a heavy mortar originated by the French. Rayé Tracté is French for rifled,towed. The Mortier is usually towed by a heavy armored vehicle called VTM 120 (Véhicule Tracteur Mortier de 120 mm). Rounds can be fired out of the Mortier by simply dropping them down the barrel. Once the rounds collide with the bottom of the barrel's tube base, automatic firing occurs. This military weapon can fire rounds as high as 8,000 ft with a kill radius of 250 ft when it hits the ground. Painting realistic textures on 3d models is a difficult task to accomplish. A main problem was making this piece look like a believable war vehicle with textures that accented the 3d model. Texturing the Mortier model was the greatest task to overcome. Slapping textures and rust on a model doesn't automatically make it look realistic. Creating believable textures is produced by doing your fair share of research, photo referencing, metal study, and how weathering affects metal and a verity of surfaces. Also, keeping in mind that this is a weapon, and that lingered gun powder also eats up the metal. wire frame The wire frames were rendered out in a blocked stage to demonstrate the actual shapes used to create the Mortier. clay renders the process
Starting with the big shapes first. Matching the same angle of the shot from the reference is a great way to make sure the first stage of creating this model is correct. Relying on one shot can be critical to the models proportions not looking accurately correct. This uses the most out of the reference images.
Early blocking stages of the model before it was finalized and converted into a highpoly. When matching the angles of the reference images, it doesn't have to be perfect. Something close to the shot will do the job and help the modeler visualize what needs to be modified or changed.
Once the model was completed and the proportions were as close as they could be to the reference image, additional attachments were made. Such as the scope. A detailed breakdown on how the shapes were made and how the scope of the Mortier was assembled in 3ds max is shown above.
Detailed exploded view of the the scope attachment. All the shapes are visible in this demonstration.
Texturing the Mortier model was the greatest challenge to accomplish. Shooting for realism in the textures can be difficult task to complete. I unwrapped all my objects in 3ds max, then exported the objects with their flattened maps backed down. I used the Foundry's Mari 3d painting program to get my textures. The objects were imported into Mari. Observing the object in front of you can be better in making textures for it. When painting the Mortier, Mari allowed me to layer my textures. Beginning with the base color of the object then leading on to dirt, rust, scratches, etc, helps bring the textures to life as well as better your work flow. It's the same as blocking the model, then proceeding to modeling.
At first, the Mortier was painted green, but then the textures were a little too much. To back away from the overwhelming rusted look, importing the textures into 3ds max and using a color correction in the material editor helped cover up almost of the textures. It ended up being a serendipity. The textures look as if paint were trying to cover up the grime and rust that the Mortier has dealt with in the past. This helped give the texture a great surface break up.
Four renders were rendered out of 3ds max, those of which included the raw beauty render, two ambient occlusion renders, and a z-depth render. Other manipulations took place within Photoshop. Blending layers and changing level corrections helped give this model proper lighting.
Mood board
A mood board was created to help provide visual reference on how this model will look. Reference
Back to top
Jaime Eduardo Fernandez jaimefernandez93@yahoo 3d Modeler
home
resume
Mortier 120mm Rayé Tracté Modèle F1 The Mortier 120mm Rayé Tracté Modèle F1 is a heavy mortar originated by the French. Rayé Tracté is French for rifled,towed. The Mortier is usually towed by a heavy armored vehicle called VTM 120 (Véhicule Tracteur Mortier de 120 mm). Rounds can be fired out of the Mortier by simply dropping them down the barrel. Once the rounds collide with the bottom of the barrel's tube base, automatic firing occurs. This military weapon can fire rounds as high as 8,000 ft with a kill radius of 250 ft when it hits the ground. Painting realistic textures on 3d models is a difficult task to accomplish. A main problem was making this piece look like a believable war vehicle with textures that accented the 3d model. Texturing the Mortier model was the greatest task to overcome. Slapping textures and rust on a model doesn't automatically make it look realistic. Creating believable textures is produced by doing your fair share of research, photo referencing, metal study, and how weathering affects metal and a verity of surfaces. Also, keeping in mind that this is a weapon, and that lingered gun powder also eats up the metal. wire frame The wire frames were rendered out in a blocked stage to demonstrate the actual shapes used to create the Mortier. clay renders the process
Starting with the big shapes first. Matching the same angle of the shot from the reference is a great way to make sure the first stage of creating this model is correct. Relying on one shot can be critical to the models proportions not looking accurately correct. This uses the most out of the reference images.
Early blocking stages of the model before it was finalized and converted into a highpoly. When matching the angles of the reference images, it doesn't have to be perfect. Something close to the shot will do the job and help the modeler visualize what needs to be modified or changed.
Once the model was completed and the proportions were as close as they could be to the reference image, additional attachments were made. Such as the scope. A detailed breakdown on how the shapes were made and how the scope of the Mortier was assembled in 3ds max is shown above.
Detailed exploded view of the the scope attachment. All the shapes are visible in this demonstration.
Texturing the Mortier model was the greatest challenge to accomplish. Shooting for realism in the textures can be difficult task to complete. I unwrapped all my objects in 3ds max, then exported the objects with their flattened maps backed down. I used the Foundry's Mari 3d painting program to get my textures. The objects were imported into Mari. Observing the object in front of you can be better in making textures for it. When painting the Mortier, Mari allowed me to layer my textures. Beginning with the base color of the object then leading on to dirt, rust, scratches, etc, helps bring the textures to life as well as better your work flow. It's the same as blocking the model, then proceeding to modeling.
At first, the Mortier was painted green, but then the textures were a little too much. To back away from the overwhelming rusted look, importing the textures into 3ds max and using a color correction in the material editor helped cover up almost of the textures. It ended up being a serendipity. The textures look as if paint were trying to cover up the grime and rust that the Mortier has dealt with in the past. This helped give the texture a great surface break up.
Four renders were rendered out of 3ds max, those of which included the raw beauty render, two ambient occlusion renders, and a z-depth render. Other manipulations took place within Photoshop. Blending layers and changing level corrections helped give this model proper lighting.
Mood board
A mood board was created to help provide visual reference on how this model will look. Reference
Back to top
Jaime Eduardo Fernandez jaimefernandez93@yahoo 3d modeler
home
resume
Mortier 120mm Rayé Tracté Modèle F1 The Mortier 120mm Rayé Tracté Modèle F1 is a heavy mortar originated by the French. Rayé Tracté is French for rifled,towed. The Mortier is usually towed by a heavy armored vehicle called VTM 120 (Véhicule Tracteur Mortier de 120 mm). Rounds can be fired out of the Mortier by simply dropping them down the barrel. Once the rounds collide with the bottom of the barrel's tube base, automatic firing occurs. This military weapon can fire rounds as high as 8,000 ft with a kill radius of 250 ft when it hits the ground. Painting realistic textures on 3d models is a difficult task to accomplish. A main problem was making this piece look like a believable war vehicle with textures that accented the 3d model. Texturing the Mortier model was the greatest task to overcome. Slapping textures and rust on a model doesn't automatically make it look realistic. Creating believable textures is produced by doing your fair share of research, photo referencing, metal study, and how weathering affects metal and a verity of surfaces. Also, keeping in mind that this is a weapon, and that lingered gun powder also eats up the metal. wire frame The wire frames were rendered out in a blocked stage to demonstrate the actual shapes used to create the Mortier. clay renders the process
Starting with the big shapes first. Matching the same angle of the shot from the reference is a great way to make sure the first stage of creating this model is correct. Relying on one shot can be critical to the models proportions not looking accurately correct. This uses the most out of the reference images.
Early blocking stages of the model before it was finalized and converted into a highpoly. When matching the angles of the reference images, it doesn't have to be perfect. Something close to the shot will do the job and help the modeler visualize what needs to be modified or changed.
Once the model was completed and the proportions were as close as they could be to the reference image, additional attachments were made. Such as the scope. A detailed breakdown on how the shapes were made and how the scope of the Mortier was assembled in 3ds max is shown above.
Detailed exploded view of the the scope attachment. All the shapes are visible in this demonstration.
Texturing the Mortier model was the greatest challenge to accomplish. Shooting for realism in the textures can be difficult task to complete. I unwrapped all my objects in 3ds max, then exported the objects with their flattened maps backed down. I used the Foundry's Mari 3d painting program to get my textures. The objects were imported into Mari. Observing the object in front of you can be better in making textures for it. When painting the Mortier, Mari allowed me to layer my textures. Beginning with the base color of the object then leading on to dirt, rust, scratches, etc, helps bring the textures to life as well as better your work flow. It's the same as blocking the model, then proceeding to modeling.
At first, the Mortier was painted green, but then the textures were a little too much. To back away from the overwhelming rusted look, importing the textures into 3ds max and using a color correction in the material editor helped cover up almost of the textures. It ended up being a serendipity. The textures look as if paint were trying to cover up the grime and rust that the Mortier has dealt with in the past. This helped give the texture a great surface break up.
Four renders were rendered out of 3ds max, those of which included the raw beauty render, two ambient occlusion renders, and a z-depth render. Other manipulations took place within Photoshop. Blending layers and changing level corrections helped give this model proper lighting.
Mood board
A mood board was created to help provide visual reference on how this model will look. Reference
Back to top
Jaime Eduardo Fernandez jaimefernandez93@yahoo 3d Modeler

 

 

home
resume
Mortier 120mm Rayé Tracté Modèle F1 The Mortier 120mm Rayé Tracté Modèle F1 is a heavy mortar originated by the French. Rayé Tracté is French for rifled,towed. The Mortier is usually towed by a heavy armored vehicle called VTM 120 (Véhicule Tracteur Mortier de 120 mm). Rounds can be fired out of the Mortier by simply dropping them down the barrel. Once the rounds collide with the bottom of the barrel's tube base, automatic firing occurs. This military weapon can fire rounds as high as 8,000 ft with a kill radius of 250 ft when it hits the ground. Painting realistic textures on 3d models is a difficult task to accomplish. A main problem was making this piece look like a believable war vehicle with textures that accented the 3d model. Texturing the Mortier model was the greatest task to overcome. Slapping textures and rust on a model doesn't automatically make it look realistic. Creating believable textures is produced by doing your fair share of research, photo referencing, metal study, and how weathering affects metal and a verity of surfaces. Also, keeping in mind that this is a weapon, and that lingered gun powder also eats up the metal. wire frame The wire frames were rendered out in a blocked stage to demonstrate the actual shapes used to create the Mortier. clay renders the process
Starting with the big shapes first. Matching the same angle of the shot from the reference is a great way to make sure the first stage of creating this model is correct. Relying on one shot can be critical to the models proportions not looking accurately correct. This uses the most out of the reference images.
Early blocking stages of the model before it was finalized and converted into a highpoly. When matching the angles of the reference images, it doesn't have to be perfect. Something close to the shot will do the job and help the modeler visualize what needs to be modified or changed.
Once the model was completed and the proportions were as close as they could be to the reference image, additional attachments were made. Such as the scope. A detailed breakdown on how the shapes were made and how the scope of the Mortier was assembled in 3ds max is shown above.
Detailed exploded view of the the scope attachment. All the shapes are visible in this demonstration.
Texturing the Mortier model was the greatest challenge to accomplish. Shooting for realism in the textures can be difficult task to complete. I unwrapped all my objects in 3ds max, then exported the objects with their flattened maps backed down. I used the Foundry's Mari 3d painting program to get my textures. The objects were imported into Mari. Observing the object in front of you can be better in making textures for it. When painting the Mortier, Mari allowed me to layer my textures. Beginning with the base color of the object then leading on to dirt, rust, scratches, etc, helps bring the textures to life as well as better your work flow. It's the same as blocking the model, then proceeding to modeling.
At first, the Mortier was painted green, but then the textures were a little too much. To back away from the overwhelming rusted look, importing the textures into 3ds max and using a color correction in the material editor helped cover up almost of the textures. It ended up being a serendipity. The textures look as if paint were trying to cover up the grime and rust that the Mortier has dealt with in the past. This helped give the texture a great surface break up.
Four renders were rendered out of 3ds max, those of which included the raw beauty render, two ambient occlusion renders, and a z-depth render. Other manipulations took place within Photoshop. Blending layers and changing level corrections helped give this model proper lighting.
Mood board
A mood board was created to help provide visual reference on how this model will look. Reference
Back to top