Jaime Eduardo Fernandez jaimefernandez93@yahoo 3d modeler
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Oil free air compressor
The Oil Free Air Compressor is a model that challenges capturing the complexity an object may have. A newly replenished compressor, yet slightly used is one of the problems to over come while creating a model such as this.
WIRE FRAME
The wire frames were rendered out in a blocked stage to demonstrate the actual shapes used to create the final look.
clay renders
the process
When attempting to create a model to replicate a real life object, you must make sure that everything is as accurate as possible. Focusing on one object can help you determine and find the relative size of all the objects around it. You can see in the image how the measurements label the height, width, and length. You'll have to eye ball some areas when it comes to it, but finding the correct measurements will help tremendously if you don't have any blue prints available. Starting with blocking the biggest shapes is the best way to go. In most cases, always model big shapes, then cut down from that.
Once the objects are correct and accurate to real size proportions, then you can proceed to the next stage which is adding in the detail. creating an environment in which the oil compressor would properly apply to, will bring a more believable look to the model. The environment has to make sense as far as making everything look functional. This demonstrates the ability to put the model into a scene it belongs in.
Now that the model is in an established environment, setting up the lighting in the scene is next. You want get the lighting to be close as possible to where this model would actually be. In this case, in a factory or some kind of warehouse. The lighting needs to represent that of a warehouse or factory to really make this model pop. In this scene, there are five lights being used. Their is a three point lighting system going on in the scene with addition lighting that includes Key lighting, which is 3, fill lighting, 1 and 4, back lighting, 5, and some image based lighting using and HDRI image, which is 2. The lights used in this scene are all photometric with the exception of the sky light.
There's always that tendency in the majority of 3d artists to immediately begin making the detail. It will take longer if you focus your concentration on one area. As mentioned before, it's best to begin with the biggest shapes then go forth from those proportions. Concentrating on the details first may cause the artist to have to redo the majority of the work if the director or client happens to want or make any changes. You can see in the example above how its numbered from the lowest read to the highest read, which is least detailed to most detailed. Biggest shapes leading to smallest shapes.
Only four passes were rendered straight out of 3ds Max for the Oil Free Ari Compressor model. A raw render, two ambient occlusion renders which consisted of a tight and a wide, and a metal pass. The other passes were manipulated in Photoshop. Those passes were, A depth of field pass, additional lighting manipulation, and desaturated colors. All these renders were edited and comped in Photoshop.
Mood board
This mood board was put together for the process of creating the environment for the Oil Free Air Compressor. Reference
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Jaime Eduardo Fernandez jaimefernandez93@yahoo 3d modeler
home
resume
Oil free air compressor The Oil Free Air Compressor is a model that challenges capturing the complexity an object may have. A newly replenished compressor, yet slightly used is one of the problems to over come while creating a model such as this. WIRE FRAME The wire frames were rendered out in a blocked stage to demonstrate the actual shapes used to create the final look. clay renders the process
When attempting to create a model to replicate a real life object, you must make sure that everything is as accurate as possible. Focusing on one object can help you determine and find the relative size of all the objects around it. You can see in the image how the measurements label the height, width, and length. You'll have to eye ball some areas when it comes to it, but finding the correct measurements will help tremendously if you don't have any blue prints available. Starting with blocking the biggest shapes is the best way to go. In most cases, always model big shapes, then cut down from that.
Once the objects are correct and accurate to real size proportions, then you can proceed to the next stage which is adding in the detail. creating an environment in which the oil compressor would properly apply to, will bring a more believable look to the model. The environment has to make sense as far as making everything look functional. This demonstrates the ability to put the model into a scene it belongs in.
Now that the model is in an established environment, setting up the lighting in the scene is next. You want get the lighting to be close as possible to where this model would actually be. In this case, in a factory or some kind of warehouse. The lighting needs to represent that of a warehouse or factory to really make this model pop. In this scene, there are five lights being used. Their is a three point lighting system going on in the scene with addition lighting that includes Key lighting, which is 3, fill lighting, 1 and 4, back lighting, 5, and some image based lighting using and HDRI image, which is 2. The lights used in this scene are all photometric with the exception of the sky light.
There's always that tendency in the majority of 3d artists to immediately begin making the detail. It will take longer if you focus your concentration on one area. As mentioned before, it's best to begin with the biggest shapes then go forth from those proportions. Concentrating on the details first may cause the artist to have to redo the majority of the work if the director or client happens to want or make any changes. You can see in the example above how its numbered from the lowest read to the highest read, which is least detailed to most detailed. Biggest shapes leading to smallest shapes.
Only four passes were rendered straight out of 3ds Max for the Oil Free Ari Compressor model. A raw render, two ambient occlusion renders which consisted of a tight and a wide, and a metal pass. The other passes were manipulated in Photoshop. Those passes were, A depth of field pass, additional lighting manipulation, and desaturated colors. All these renders were edited and comped in Photoshop.
Mood board
This mood board was put together for the process of creating the environment for the Oil Free Air Compressor. Reference
Back to top
Jaime Eduardo Fernandez jaimefernandez93@yahoo 3d Modeler
home
resume
Oil free air compressor The Oil Free Air Compressor is a model that challenges capturing the complexity an object may have. A newly replenished compressor, yet slightly used is one of the problems to over come while creating a model such as this. WIRE FRAME The wire frames were rendered out in a blocked stage to demonstrate the actual shapes used to create the final look. clay renders process
When attempting to create a model to replicate a real life object, you must make sure that everything is as accurate as possible. Focusing on one object can help you determine and find the relative size of all the objects around it. You can see in the image how the measurements label the height, width, and length. You'll have to eye ball some areas when it comes to it, but finding the correct measurements will help tremendously if you don't have any blue prints available. Starting with blocking the biggest shapes is the best way to go. In most cases, always model big shapes, then cut down from that.
Once the objects are correct and accurate to real size proportions, then you can proceed to the next stage which is adding in the detail. creating an environment in which the oil compressor would properly apply to, will bring a more believable look to the model. The environment has to make sense as far as making everything look functional. This demonstrates the ability to put the model into a scene it belongs in.
Now that the model is in an established environment, setting up the lighting in the scene is next. You want get the lighting to be close as possible to where this model would actually be. In this case, in a factory or some kind of warehouse. The lighting needs to represent that of a warehouse or factory to really make this model pop. In this scene, there are five lights being used. Their is a three point lighting system going on in the scene with addition lighting that includes Key lighting, which is 3, fill lighting, 1 and 4, back lighting, 5, and some image based lighting using and HDRI image, which is 2. The lights used in this scene are all photometric with the exception of the sky light.
There's always that tendency in the majority of 3d artists to immediately begin making the detail. It will take longer if you focus your concentration on one area. As mentioned before, it's best to begin with the biggest shapes then go forth from those proportions. Concentrating on the details first may cause the artist to have to redo the majority of the work if the director or client happens to want or make any changes. You can see in the example above how its numbered from the lowest read to the highest read, which is least detailed to most detailed. Biggest shapes leading to smallest shapes.
Only four passes were rendered straight out of 3ds Max for the Oil Free Ari Compressor model. A raw render, two ambient occlusion renders which consisted of a tight and a wide, and a metal pass. The other passes were manipulated in Photoshop. Those passes were, A depth of field pass, additional lighting manipulation, and desaturated colors. All these renders were edited and comped in Photoshop.
Mood board Mood board
This mood board was put together for the process of creating the environment for the Oil Free Air Compressor. Reference
Back to top
Jaime Eduardo Fernandez jaimefernandez93@yahoo 3d modeler
home
resume
Oil free air compressor The Oil Free Air Compressor is a model that challenges capturing the complexity an object may have. A newly replenished compressor, yet slightly used is one of the problems to over come while creating a model such as this. WIRE FRAME The wire frames were rendered out in a blocked stage to demonstrate the actual shapes used to create the final look. clay renders process
When attempting to create a model to replicate a real life object, you must make sure that everything is as accurate as possible. Focusing on one object can help you determine and find the relative size of all the objects around it. You can see in the image how the measurements label the height, width, and length. You'll have to eye ball some areas when it comes to it, but finding the correct measurements will help tremendously if you don't have any blue prints available. Starting with blocking the biggest shapes is the best way to go. In most cases, always model big shapes, then cut down from that.
Once the objects are correct and accurate to real size proportions, then you can proceed to the next stage which is adding in the detail. creating an environment in which the oil compressor would properly apply to, will bring a more believable look to the model. The environment has to make sense as far as making everything look functional. This demonstrates the ability to put the model into a scene it belongs in.
Now that the model is in an established environment, setting up the lighting in the scene is next. You want get the lighting to be close as possible to where this model would actually be. In this case, in a factory or some kind of warehouse. The lighting needs to represent that of a warehouse or factory to really make this model pop. In this scene, there are five lights being used. Their is a three point lighting system going on in the scene with addition lighting that includes Key lighting, which is 3, fill lighting, 1 and 4, back lighting, 5, and some image based lighting using and HDRI image, which is 2. The lights used in this scene are all photometric with the exception of the sky light.
There's always that tendency in the majority of 3d artists to immediately begin making the detail. It will take longer if you focus your concentration on one area. As mentioned before, it's best to begin with the biggest shapes then go forth from those proportions. Concentrating on the details first may cause the artist to have to redo the majority of the work if the director or client happens to want or make any changes. You can see in the example above how its numbered from the lowest read to the highest read, which is least detailed to most detailed. Biggest shapes leading to smallest shapes.
Only four passes were rendered straight out of 3ds Max for the Oil Free Ari Compressor model. A raw render, two ambient occlusion renders which consisted of a tight and a wide, and a metal pass. The other passes were manipulated in Photoshop. Those passes were, A depth of field pass, additional lighting manipulation, and desaturated colors. All these renders were edited and comped in Photoshop.
Mood board
This mood board was put together for the process of creating the environment for the Oil Free Air Compressor. Reference
Back to top
Jaime Eduardo Fernandez jaimefernandez93@yahoo 3d Modeler

 

 

home
resume
Oil free air compressor The Oil Free Air Compressor is a model that challenges capturing the complexity an object may have. A newly replenished compressor, yet slightly used is one of the problems to over come while creating a model such as this. WIRE FRAME The wire frames were rendered out in a blocked stage to demonstrate the actual shapes used to create the final look. clay renders process
When attempting to create a model to replicate a real life object, you must make sure that everything is as accurate as possible. Focusing on one object can help you determine and find the relative size of all the objects around it. You can see in the image how the measurements label the height, width, and length. You'll have to eye ball some areas when it comes to it, but finding the correct measurements will help tremendously if you don't have any blue prints available. Starting with blocking the biggest shapes is the best way to go. In most cases, always model big shapes, then cut down from that.
Once the objects are correct and accurate to real size proportions, then you can proceed to the next stage which is adding in the detail. creating an environment in which the oil compressor would properly apply to, will bring a more believable look to the model. The environment has to make sense as far as making everything look functional. This demonstrates the ability to put the model into a scene it belongs in.
Now that the model is in an established environment, setting up the lighting in the scene is next. You want get the lighting to be close as possible to where this model would actually be. In this case, in a factory or some kind of warehouse. The lighting needs to represent that of a warehouse or factory to really make this model pop. In this scene, there are five lights being used. Their is a three point lighting system going on in the scene with addition lighting that includes Key lighting, which is 3, fill lighting, 1 and 4, back lighting, 5, and some image based lighting using and HDRI image, which is 2. The lights used in this scene are all photometric with the exception of the sky light.
There's always that tendency in the majority of 3d artists to immediately begin making the detail. It will take longer if you focus your concentration on one area. As mentioned before, it's best to begin with the biggest shapes then go forth from those proportions. Concentrating on the details first may cause the artist to have to redo the majority of the work if the director or client happens to want or make any changes. You can see in the example above how its numbered from the lowest read to the highest read, which is least detailed to most detailed. Biggest shapes leading to smallest shapes.
Only four passes were rendered straight out of 3ds Max for the Oil Free Ari Compressor model. A raw render, two ambient occlusion renders which consisted of a tight and a wide, and a metal pass. The other passes were manipulated in Photoshop. Those passes were, A depth of field pass, additional lighting manipulation, and desaturated colors. All these renders were edited and comped in Photoshop.
Mood board
This mood board was put together for the process of creating the environment for the Oil Free Air Compressor. Reference
Back to top